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TWF

Rotor Build Part 5: Conclusion
Posted by J.S. Decker on May 9, 2008, 19:27


This is the final part of the Rotor build log.  I have not included much detail on finishing, but I have also included a couple a photos from taken while finishing the fuse and LEís of the wing and stab.





Rotor Build Part 4: Internal Bits
Posted by J.S. Decker on May 9, 2008, 19:26

In this part, fabrication and installation of the internal parts is demonstrated.  The internal parts include the ballast tube, crush blocks, servo trays, canopy formers, and other parts that you canít see from the outside of the plane.




Rotor Build Part 3: Fin and Stab Installation
Posted by J.S. Decker on May 3, 2008, 15:27

After getting the wings mounted, it is time to mount the fin and stab.




Rotor Build Part 2: Pitcheron/Wingeron Hardware Installation
Posted by J.S. Decker on Apr 27, 2008, 15:59

The first major assembly step is to install the pitcheron/wingeron hardware.



Rotor Build Part 1: Preassembly and Component Weights
Posted by J.S. Decker on Apr 26, 2008, 21:13

Thought I would share my typical TWF assembly procedure.  This particular TWF is my version of a Rotor. 




Power Tools: Homemade Three-setting Vacuum System
Posted by J.S. Decker on Jan 12, 2008, 13:41
Sometimes I just geek myself out, and that is what I have done with my new vacuum system for vacuum bagging that can be set to three different vacuum ranges with a three-position switch.  I do not know how many vacuum systems that I have built, but the number exceeds half a dozen.  Yet, for the last year or so I have wanted to build yet another vacuum system that I could switch between three vacuum settings use the most frequently without resetting a vacuum switch.



TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 4 of 4)
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 30, 2007, 15:04
This is the fourth and final part of a series of articles on installing joiner tubes in sparless TWF wings.



TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 3 of 4)
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 30, 2007, 15:03
This is the third part of a series of articles on installing joiner tubes in sparless TWF wings.



TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 2 of 4)
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 30, 2007, 15:02
This is the second part of a series of articles on installing joiner tubes in sparless TWF wings.



TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 1 of 4)
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 30, 2007, 15:01
My goals with my sparless wing joiner tube installation technique are 1) to minimize time spent preparing the cores for vacuum bagging the skins on, 2) result in a sufficiently robust structure, and 3) be simple to execute.  Using the technique described below, I can have an Ultron, JARTeron, or Rotor prepíd for bagging with a few hours of work, if I do not make any mistakes that require additional time to fixed.  I have yet to have a wing in-flight failure, and for those less than optimal landings, this joiner system performs better than a conventional plywood rib and sub-rib system.  And, the technique does not require any special jigs or other tools not found in the typical scratch builderís shop.  Here is the step-by-step procedure for joiner tube installation that I use...



Power Tools: Bench Sanders
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 23, 2007, 01:41
Most of my bulk construction is performed with a band saw and disk sander.  Here are some things that you might consider when purchasing, setting up, and getting the most from bench sanders for composite model construction...




Power Tools: Band Saws
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 17, 2007, 19:29
Most of my bulk construction is performed with a band saw and disk sander.  If you have the space to setup both tools, the band saw and disk sander set up is a well proven scratch building path.  If you have limited space, you might consider a high quality scroll saw, e.g., the DeWalt DW788, and using both scroll saw blades and scroll saw sanding strips.  If you choose to use a band saw, here are some things that you might consider when purchasing, setting up, and getting the most from your band saw composite model construction:



The most important tool in my shop...
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 13, 2007, 21:32
is not the band saw, Dremel, or any other conventional model building tool.  It is my notebook.  My notebook serves as a log of where Iíve been.  It contains doodles and other ideas as well as shopping lists and notes where I got things, like where I last purchase d 60-inch wide Kevlar and how much I paid for it.



A Dozen Rules of Thumb for Composite Repair
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 7, 2007, 18:19

Having enough experience to have rules of thumb for repairing composite model airplanes is not a positive statement about my piloting ability.  Be that as it may, these rules of thumb are based on my experience and what make sense to me.  You will probably never have need to consider them, but just incase you do, they might be worth a gander.



TWF Bonanza: Rotor, Xica, and V-max Plans
Posted by J.S. Decker on Dec 5, 2007, 19:17

Ken Stuhr's VS Sailplanes designs were years ahead of their time when they were first offered in the 1980's.  Even today VS pitcheron and wingeron planes are highly prized among TWF aficionados.  The ideas and concepts Ken put into elegant execution with his designs will continue to inspire TWF designers well into the future.  While Ken does not intent to produce or license the production of the VS line again, he agreed to release the plans for free public distribution.  No longer will VS plans have to be swapped or sold on dark street corners under dubious circumstances.



Great News for TWF Fans!
Posted by Greg Smith on Dec 3, 2007, 09:51

We are excited to welcome a new section to the slopeflyer.com site! Jay Decker will be heading up a new section called TWF for you pitcheron and wingeron fans out there. Jay is a true devote to the TWF way of life and has designed or owned some of the coolest wingerons and pitcherons out there. I am really looking forward to this section as I too am afflicted with a TWF. I have a Pixel, 2 Picas and a McLean Vector on the way as well as 2 designs on the boards.

So, welcome Jay and good luck!

Greg





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TWF
Rotor Build Part 5: Conclusion
Rotor Build Part 4: Internal Bits
Rotor Build Part 3: Fin and Stab Installation
Rotor Build Part 2: Pitcheron/Wingeron Hardware Installation
Rotor Build Part 1: Preassembly and Component Weights
Power Tools: Homemade Three-setting Vacuum System
TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 4 of 4)
TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 3 of 4)
TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 2 of 4)
TWF Techniques: Sparless Wing Joiner Tube Installation (Part 1 of 4)
Power Tools: Bench Sanders
Power Tools: Band Saws
The most important tool in my shop...
A Dozen Rules of Thumb for Composite Repair
TWF Bonanza: Rotor, Xica, and V-max Plans
Great News for TWF Fans!


Help support slopeflyer.com: make a donation!

If you have a slope location you like and want to add it to our list,
give us a description, directions and contact info, send it to Greg